Ramblings, Rants and Fieldnotes

6 notes

shrinkrants:


As in my chapter on the politicization of patienthood, in this chapter on doctors’ narratives I show the possibility of resisting the power/knowledge nexus that Foucault called “biopower,” this time from the doctor’s side of the binary. Deleuze and Guattari are interested not only in the ways in which power/knowledge operates but also in the minority discourses (like Foucault’s “subjugated knowledges”) that can and do emerge not from beyond or behind the operations of power/knowledge, but from within it. This does not mean, however, that doctors become patients in reality, but that they are constantly becoming-patient through the process of desubjectification (a giving up of their identity as, or only as, doctor within the doctor-patient binary), deterritorialization (a movement away from the institutional spaces and practices of medicine that create distance rather than proximity between doctor and patient), and disarticulation (an unlearning of certain modern meical knowledges and practices cultivated in medical school). I consider the possibility of doctors’ becoming-infected and becoming-affected by their patients; again, not in reality, by HIV itself, but by their patients’ stories.

—Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p xxi

shrinkrants:

As in my chapter on the politicization of patienthood, in this chapter on doctors’ narratives I show the possibility of resisting the power/knowledge nexus that Foucault called “biopower,” this time from the doctor’s side of the binary. Deleuze and Guattari are interested not only in the ways in which power/knowledge operates but also in the minority discourses (like Foucault’s “subjugated knowledges”) that can and do emerge not from beyond or behind the operations of power/knowledge, but from within it. This does not mean, however, that doctors become patients in reality, but that they are constantly becoming-patient through the process of desubjectification (a giving up of their identity as, or only as, doctor within the doctor-patient binary), deterritorialization (a movement away from the institutional spaces and practices of medicine that create distance rather than proximity between doctor and patient), and disarticulation (an unlearning of certain modern meical knowledges and practices cultivated in medical school). I consider the possibility of doctors’ becoming-infected and becoming-affected by their patients; again, not in reality, by HIV itself, but by their patients’ stories.

—Lisa Diedrich, Treatments: Language, politics, and the culture of illness. p xxi

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afterellen:

The AfterEllen.com Field Guide to Recruiting Lesbians

Oh, South Carolina, bless your little soul for consistently producing some of the most truly head-scratching stories of ignorance in the country. The most recent example? The University of South Carolina Upstate is canceling a performance called How to Be a Lesbian in 10 Days or Less, because, apparently, no one has a sense of humor. State Senator Mike Fair seems to believe that the show is a “recruiting” event and, to be honest, I actually have no words to respond to that.

Senator Fair, I hate to break it to you, but we don’t actually recruit. If we did, however, I think our field guide might look something like this.

(via ilovecharts)